Student Voices as Leaders

As part of the Early Childhood Educators of BC and the Canadian Child Care Federation National Conference in the Spring 2019 they are hosting a Students Voices as Leaders to be listened to.  They have created a blog site at http://ececstudentleaders.weebly.com/   and  are inviting students, instructors and ECEC field professionals to celebrate the voices of students as leaders.  Every few weeks between now and the conference they will post a new question to explore , currently they  have:

a) why student voices 

b) celebrating student work

Any one is free to add in comments and resources to celebrate  students as leaders.

Please share and join in the conversations across the country!

 

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Your Voice Matters, GET INVOLVED!

I am a George Brown College Student in the Early Childhood Education diploma program, and I have done my third field placement at The Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario (AECEO). The field placement at AECEO was entirely different from my first two placements in two ways. Firstly, instead of working in an Early Childhood setting with the children, I was working in an office environment. Secondly, the focus of my work was representing registered early childhood educators (RECEs). I chose this alternative placement to gain more in-depth knowledge about the field of ECE, the issues currently being faced by the sector and the role and importance of advocacy in the ECE sector. At the beginning of my placement, I was very nervous and overwhelmed. But, as the time passed and with the support and guidance of team AECEO, I started to understand the different tasks and activities, the AECEO is a part of and lead.

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Interning at the AECEO

When I first began my internship at the Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario (AECEO) I had a combination of nervousness and excitement. I knew very little about the organization, but I brought curiosity and enthusiasm with me to expand my knowledge of the early childhood profession. I felt welcomed by all of the AECEO staff as soon as I walked through the doors. They made me feel like I was part of a team, something I had never experienced before. I could not wait to begin my journey as AECEO`s summer intern!

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Interning at the AECEO during the Provincial Elections

The opportunity to intern at the AECEO during the provincial elections was a really great learning experience. I got to see firsthand, the on-going advocacy work of the association as they worked hard to ensure early childhood educator voices were being heard by candidates and voters. 

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My Reflection on Ontario's Early Years Development

            I am currently a third-year student in the Early Childhood Leadership degree program at George Brown College and I’m interning this summer at the Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario (AECEO). During my orientation I read through a list of published policy reports and AECEO publications.

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My Placement Experience at the AECEO

Blog post by Min Kyung You

GBC ECE Student

Field placement experiences are critical for students in early childhood education programs in Ontario. During placement, students have opportunities to apply their theoretical knowledge and skills learned from course work into practice with young children, families and community. While I was an ECE student at George Brown College, I had three different field placements with children of all different age groups. Having different placement experiences, I learned valuable and practical skills and gained knowledge while in working in childcare settings.

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What Led Me to Advocacy

For as long as I can remember, I have been inundated with the message that I am “good with kids”. It is true that I have always had an affinity for young children; even in my own childhood I would jump at any opportunity to play with a baby or to help a parent change a diaper. I started babysitting at a young age and continued to do so all through my adolescence and into early adulthood, making the transition to full-time childcare work as I served as a nanny for several different families in my early twenties. The notion that I was innately talented at caring for children, however, never sat right with me. It reeked of the feminization of care work,   devaluing the knowledge and skills that I acquired over a decade of childminding. I loved all the children infinitely, of course, but the work was physically, mentally, and emotionally taxing. I had internalized these messages so profoundly that I was uncomfortable with speaking up about any professional challenges that I experienced for fear that my identity as a naturally capable caregiver would be compromised. I was left with the feeling that the work I was doing was unskilled and unimportant, and that I was somehow less competent and intelligent as my friends working in different fields.

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4 Reasons Why You Should Do Your Placement at the AECEO

Being an intern has its perks!

Are you a student interested in policy and advocacy? Do you want to see a change in the early childhood profession in Ontario? If so, the Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario (AECEO) is the ideal organization to complete your placement with! Hesitant? Let’s look at four reasons why you should do your placement here… 

 

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78 Days in the Life of an Educator: Why I Advocate

I needed a job. I was going into the final year of my undergrad with the student debt from the last three years piling on. After months of searching I still wasn’t able to find a full-time position even though I already had my RECE qualifications. I received an email from an employer shortly after giving up offering me a full-time temporary position at a licensed child care centre. As a student with no money and four months off from school, I accepted it.

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Getting Ready for September; Tips and pointers to prepare for the first year of post-secondary

LONDON, Ont. (June 21, 2017)— The high school year is not quite done, and no doubt soon-to-be graduates are thinking more about their prom and graduation parties than they are their pending arrival in the post-secondary world.

But school choices are now in, and once summer vacation hits it will be time to start thinking about and preparing for their first year after high school.

“Post-secondary school is not like high school, and the workload, expectations and independence can catch some students off guard,” says Heather Cummings, Executive Director, Student Success, Fanshawe College. “Dedicating a little bit of time over the summer to get ready and familiarize yourself with your new school can make a huge difference once classes start after Labour Day.”

Fanshawe offers the following five tips to help recent graduates get ready for their first year:  

  1. Be social. Today’s youth are already active on social media. It is their top source of information. Seek out where your school is on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and perhaps even Snapchat, and follow them. They will be providing key information about upcoming events and resources available for incoming students. If you come across any online groups, join in the conversation. You may make some new friends before the school year even begins.
  2. Get to know the school and surrounding neighbourhood. Many schools offer times in the summer when you can visit and tour the campus, check out the facilities and amenities, check out the area around the campus, pick up your student card, engage with various student organizations and clubs, complete any post-admission requirements and meet other students who will be starting with you — and facing many of the same apprehensions and challenges.
  3. Find a place to live. Maybe you have applied for residence and hope to live on campus. But space is limited and these spots are often not guaranteed. It won’t hurt to browse some of the off-campus housing available. It is also wise to review your rights and responsibilities as a tenant, especially if this will be your first time living away from your parents’ home.
  4. Start a list. There are a lot of items you’ll want to have at school with you — from academic requirements to personal items. Start a list of those things you want to take, and post it on your bulletin board or the refrigerator so that you can easily update it if something new comes to mind. Build this list throughout the summer so that when it’s time to pack you will already know everything you are going to need.
  5. Save. There are costs associated with post-secondary school that you didn’t have to worry about in high school. Besides tuition, you will have to buy your books and any supplies specific to your program. There is rent to pay and food to buy. And that says nothing for the incidentals — after all, you will also want to maintain some sort of social life to balance with your studies. Make a budget and start saving. You can also seek out some financial help. Many students don’t realize how many bursaries, grants and scholarships are there, waiting to be tapped. A quick Google search will uncover several opportunities for financial help. It is never too late to apply. There are also many financial management seminars available at colleges and universities over the summer that offer the support of campus experts.

“Starting post-secondary school is a big transition,” says Cummings. “But it will always be a benefit to be prepared.”

About Fanshawe College:

Fanshawe is one of Ontario’s largest colleges, with campuses in London, Simcoe, St. Thomas and Woodstock serving close to half a million people with a promise to educate, engage, empower and excite. For 50 years, Fanshawe has been helping people to unlock their potential and achieve success. The College attracts students from 70 countries every year and opens up a world of possibilities through more than 200 degree, diploma and certificate programs, along with apprenticeship training. Fanshawe celebrates its 50thanniversary in 2017, an exciting opportunity to reflect on how much the College has grown since 1967 and how it will continue to have a meaningful impact on future students.

Visit Fanshawe College ECE Program here

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